Superior Forger

Need your help picking out a pc

7 posts in this topic

For 10 years now I have had a 32-bit pc and haven't had the luxury of power to making videos. They take all day on my pc with the little things that I put into making videos. I'm not looking to move into pc gaming, but I would like to play a few like roller-coaster tycoon and other simple ones without my system glitching up and so on. Technically I could play those games on my PC, I just have to turn a lot of shit off and it's a pain in the neck.

So I'm looking to do more powerful video editing and learning new programs and so forth. I think a minimum 8gbs would do, but I'm pushing for 16. If you any of you have any recommendations it would be helpful. I don't now a lot about hardware or graphics cards and such to just build my own pc without other complications. I know pc's can get pricey as hell, but I would probably be willing to spend $1,600 - $2,800. on one. That's really pushing it though.

Yea, so I have to save a bit more, but here is final verdict: Unless I get a 3rd job or a better job in the next few months, "still thinking about where I want to be". I can't buy this PC tell October-November this year, which isn't so bad. At least I will never have to buy another one.. I hope! Below are the specks of the PC I'm getting which adds up to $3,075. I must say It's not far off from expected in price.

Specs:

  • Gaming Chassis: CYBERPOWERPC X-Titan 200 Full Tower Gaming Case w/ USB 3.0, Fan Control, EZ Swap HDD Dock, Side Panel Window (Black Color)
  • Extra Case Fans: 3X 120mm Case Fans
  • Noise Reduction Technology: Sound Absorbing Foam on Side, Top And Bottom panels, and more(1) CPU: Intel® Core™ Processor i7-6700K 4.00GHZ 8MB Intel Smart Cache LGA1151 (Skylake)
  • CPU / Processor Cooling Fan: CyberPowerPC Coolit LCS ECO-III 240mm LCS System w/ Copper Cold Plate (4 x RED (Push-Pull) Tt Riing 12 Series Case/Radiator Fans)
  • Motherboard: MSI Z170A Gaming Pro CARBON ATX w/ Programmable Lighting, USB 3.1, 3 PCIe x16, 4 PCIe x1, 1 SATA Express, 4 SATA3, 1 Ultra M.2
  • RAM / System Memory: 64GB (16GBx4) DDR4/3000MHz Dual Channel Memory (ADATA XPG Z1)
  • Video Card: GeForce® GT 730 2GB GDDR3 (Dual Card (Non-SLI))
  • Sli Bridge: EVGA Pro SLI Bridge V2 [2-Way SLI]
  • Power Supply: 1,200 Watts - Thermaltake Toughpower - 80 PLUS Gold, Semi Modular Power Supply
  • Hard Drive: 2TB (2TBx1) SATA-III 6.0Gb/s 64MB Cache 7200RPM HDD (2TB x 4 (8TB Capacity) RAID 0 Extreme Performance)
  • Secondary Hard Drive: 240GB SanDisk Z410 SATA III 6.0Gb/s SSD - 535 MB/s Read & 440 MB/s Write (240GB x 2 (240GB Capacity) RAID 1 Performance with Data Security)
  • Optical Drive: 24X Double Layer Dual Format DVD+-R/+-RW + CD-R/RW Drive (BLACK COLOR)
  • Optical Drive 2: LG 12X Internal Blu-ray Drive & DVDRW, 3D Playback Combo Drive (BLACK COLOR)
  • Internal Wireless Network Card: 802.11b/g/n 300Mbps PCI-E Wireless Adapter Network Card
  • Sound: HIGH DEFINITION ON-BOARD 7.1 AUDIO
  • LCD Monitor: * 24" Widescreen 1920x1080 ASUS VS247H-P 1080P (23.6" Viewable) 2ms LED Backlight, DVI, HDMI Input (Dual Monitor)
  • Cables: 10-FT HDMI v1.4 Cable Type-A Male to Male High Speed Cable (2 pieces)
  • Internal Network Card: Onboard Gigabit LAN Network
  • Mouse: CyberpowerPC Standard 4000 DPI with Weight System Optical Gaming Mouse

Edited by Superior Forger

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$1600 is actually a really good starting point for building a powerful workstation.

Since you're building this computer for work, rather than play, you'll need to look at giving your system a lot of headroom. I would recommend no lower than 16GBs of RAM and a processor of at least 4.2 Ghz (I prefer AMD, but that's up to you). A big thing with video editing is previewing your work before render. This is very memory intensive, which is why RAM is important. Rendering has more to do with the CPU. Generally, a higher core processor will better aid you in faster rendering. Of course, there are some beefy-ass quad and hex core CPUs out there that could give you an advantage over an 8-core.

The overall speed by which you'll navigate through your workstation will be largely dependent on which graphics processor (GPU) you get. Personally, I would recommend a Workstation GPU over a gaming one; however, since you want to still play a few game son this machine, I'd recommend going with a higher-end graphics card. Again, I personally prefer the AMD framework, but that's up to you.

Next, is something a lot of artists overlook: Motherboards. You want a strong board to cycle power from component to component. You'll hear terms like "bus speed" go around a lot, which refer to the overall speed and efficiency of the board. Do not skimp out and buy a budget board if your goal is to build a strong computer for editing and rendering video.

I can put together a couple wishlists for you on Newegg, if you'd like. I'll make one for the low end of your budget and another for the high end. Let me know!

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Oh sweet, that would be great Jeff. I do have a question though. What are your preferences on overclocked cpu? Is it something to stay away from or is it not necessary for what I'm doing? It sounds like something that will lower the lifetime of the CPU and other components, but I haven't actually done much research into it so I don't really know...

$1600 is actually a really good starting point for building a powerful workstation.

Since you're building this computer for work, rather than play, you'll need to look at giving your system a lot of headroom. I would recommend no lower than 16GBs of RAM and a processor of at least 4.2 Ghz (I prefer AMD, but that's up to you). A big thing with video editing is previewing your work before render. This is very memory intensive, which is why RAM is important. Rendering has more to do with the CPU. Generally, a higher core processor will better aid you in faster rendering. Of course, there are some beefy-ass quad and hex core CPUs out there that could give you an advantage over an 8-core.

The overall speed by which you'll navigate through your workstation will be largely dependent on which graphics processor (GPU) you get. Personally, I would recommend a Workstation GPU over a gaming one; however, since you want to still play a few game son this machine, I'd recommend going with a higher-end graphics card. Again, I personally prefer the AMD framework, but that's up to you.

Next, is something a lot of artists overlook: Motherboards. You want a strong board to cycle power from component to component. You'll hear terms like "bus speed" go around a lot, which refer to the overall speed and efficiency of the board. Do not skimp out and buy a budget board if your goal is to build a strong computer for editing and rendering video.

I can put together a couple wishlists for you on Newegg, if you'd like. I'll make one for the low end of your budget and another for the high end. Let me know!

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Not yet. I'm currently only working 2-3 days a week and applying to 2nd jobs. So my deadline got pushed back a bit :(

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The only thing that really concerns me is the video card. Though it looks good spec and budget-wise, it's not particularly strong for use in games or in video editing. If that's the card you're really sold on, I'd dial back the amount of RAM you're putting on your board. You just won't need it, since that card will bottleneck your system. I'd definitely recommend getting a more beefy video card

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Nice catch, I didn't even think of that. I upgraded to two of these: GeForce® GTX 980 Ti 6GB GDDR5 (Maxwell)[VR Ready]. I also upgraded the motherboard to this: MSI Z170A Gaming M7 ATX w/ USB 3.1, 3 PCIe x16, 4 PCIe x1, 2 SATA Express, 6 SATA3, 2 Ultra M.2 (Extreme OC Certified). I still want to have 64GB of Ram. I plan to do a shit-ton of video editing and photoshop and maybe even music. But that's a long road ahead. I'm thinking I will buy the O.S.'s seperately and just get the PC with no OS on it. I plan to put Win 10, Win 7, and Win Server 2016. I want to learn a ton of stuff that I simply cannot do with what I have currently. This could be my ticket to get my life on track.

Oh, I did want to ask you if you thought a 1200 Watt power supply was overkill. And if a max 1200watt/1300 watt UPS would do any good with a power outage if the PC is just as much wattage as the UPS or more. I don't think that would work to well. I'm tempting to get a UPS just because I don't want something dumb to happen with power outages and the rare occasion it damages the PC. I thought about a power strip, but I'm not sure about that either.

The only thing that really concerns me is the video card. Though it looks good spec and budget-wise, it's not particularly strong for use in games or in video editing. If that's the card you're really sold on, I'd dial back the amount of RAM you're putting on your board. You just won't need it, since that card will bottleneck your system. I'd definitely recommend getting a more beefy video card

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